Selby Gardens ‛bioblitzes’ the Sister Keys
The 'bioblitzers' take a break with the support of a Sister Keys mangrove. – Submitted Photo

Selby Gardens ‛bioblitzes’ the Sister Keys

By Rusty Chinnis - May 30, 2021 I’ve always been a big fan of Sarasota’s Selby Gardens and the work it does in the community and beyond. As a member, I stop…

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How and Why to Release Fish Alive
Captain John Kipp prepares to release a tarpon after reviving it in the water next to the boat. - Rusty Chinnis | Sun

How and Why to Release Fish Alive

By Rusty Chinnis - May 24, 2021 Catch and release used to be a relatively new concept in sport fishing, one that recognized that fish populations are vulnerable and not the endless…

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Covid-Safe Sister Keys Clean Up
Native species were planted on upland area of the Sister Keys, created with the material dredged to create the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in the late 1800s. The islands are one of the best examples of a thriving native marine environment in coastal Florida.

Covid-Safe Sister Keys Clean Up

By Rusty Chinnis Suncoast Waterkeeper is teaming up with Sarasota Bay Watch this year when they conduct their Annual Sister Keys Clean up on Saturday, March 6. The event is…

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What happened to catch and release?
Keeping big fish like tarpon in the water is critical. Andy Mill measures a tarpon while Captain Doug Kilpatrick assists. – Rusty Chinnis | Sun

What happened to catch and release?

Catch and release used to be an accepted practice that acknowledged that fish populations are not the bottomless resource they were once thought to be. Proper catch-and-release methods are more important now than ever. Lately, however, a lot of posts of dead fish are appearing on social media that seem to be taken more to impress others and get likes than to provide a meal.

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Now, Working to Improve The Things That Matter Most
Sarasota Bay Watch members and volunteers celebrate one of their 2018 clam releases. - Rusty Chinnis | Sun

Now, Working to Improve The Things That Matter Most

If you’re feeling like you are helpless in the face of the political and environmental storms that have rocked our lives recently, I would like to propose a path forward. We have the ability to help make real, positive changes that benefit our present and the future for generations to come. I have some suggestions on how to do that.

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Enlightened Self Interest in the Voting Booth
Perico Preserve, one of Manatee County's newest parks, was once slated for a housing development and shopping center.
- Rusty Chinnis | Sun

Enlightened Self Interest in the Voting Booth

There's less than a week until election day, and regular readers of this column can probably guess how this writer will be voting. I’ve said it more than once, but this bears repeating. I don’t consider myself a Republican or a Democrat, I vote environment. On Tuesday, Nov. 3rd, I will be casting my vote based on research I’ve done on how the candidates have voted in the past. 

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Trading courtesy for discourtesy afloat

The next time a personal watercraft driver interrupts your fishing, call them over and wish them a “nice day." These days, if you’re not careful, it’s easy to let inconsiderate anglers, boaters and Jet Skiers ruin your peace of mind. Over the years I’ve adopted a policy that I call, “Show them the courtesy they don’t show you.” My intention is to carry this in the back of my mind at all times. I found it necessary to do this because for so many years it was a knee jerk reaction to unload on anyone who got in my “space” while I was fishing.

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Troubled Waters — Who Wants to Swim in Sewage?

In just the last two months there’s been a multi-thousand-gallon sewage spill in Manatee County, a potentially multi-million-gallon discharge from a broken sewer line from Longboat Key to the mainland and a persistent lyngbya bloom (a potentially toxic algae) that is becoming explosive in Anna Maria Sound and surrounding waters. In just the last two months there’s been a multi-thousand-gallon sewage spill in Manatee County, a potentially multi-million-gallon discharge from a broken sewer line from Longboat Key to the mainland and a persistent lyngbya bloom (a potentially toxic algae) that is becoming explosive in Anna Maria Sound and surrounding waters.

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